ACROBATS TAKE THE PLUNGE IN CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S WATER-DRENCHED TRAPEZE ACT

Cirque du Soleil’s Grand Chapiteau or Big Top has taken up residence at Stampede Park until Sept. 17.

Acrobats face unique challenges when performing in water trapeze acts. The temperature of the water needs to be just right, and gripping the apparatus can be more difficult. (GAVIN YOUNG / POSTMEDIA)

Cirque du Soleil’s Grand Chapiteau or Big Top has taken up residence at Stampede Park until Sept. 17.

For the next month it will be the home of Luzia, a tribute to Mexican art, culture, traditions, sounds and colours.

Luzia, which was created in Montreal in the fall of 2016, is the 38th Cirque creation since 1984 and it is the 17th show to travel in one of the specially created tent theatres.

It will come as no surprise to fans of Cirque that one or more of the routines in Luzia will involve a trapeze. The trapeze in all its different forms from bars, hoops, ribbons and ropes has been a staple of these Canadian spectacles since day one and of circuses in general for more than 170 years.

The trapeze was created in the mid 1800s by a young French acrobat named Jules Leotard. He rigged his apparatus above the family swimming pool so if his practise routines misfired, the water would cushion Leotard’s fall.

LEAVE A REPLY