CORINNA CHONG OF KELOWNA, B.C. WINS THE 2021 CBC SHORT STORY PRIZE

Chong won the $6,000 grand prize for her story, Kids in Kindergarten

CBC BOOKS, CBC’s online home for literary content, together with its partners the Canada Council for the Arts and Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, today announced Corinna Chong of Kelowna, B.C. as the winner of the 2021 CBC Short Story Prize. Chong’s  story, Kids in Kindergarten, was selected from nearly 3,000 entries.

As the grand-prize winner, Chong will receive $6,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and her story has been published on CBCBooks.ca. She will also receive a two-week writing residency at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

The 2021 CBC Short Story jurors Souvankham Thammavongsa, Craig Davidson and Lee Maracle, said this about Chong’s story:

Kids in Kindergarten is a story about the quietly devastating things we don’t say out loud. Small, seemingly meaningless words like ‘it’ and ‘this’ are made to amplify and carry power so beautifully. The writer has a wonderful ear for sound and speech;  a sense for what a real voice can do on the page, filling in character, and creating talk that reveals and feels so true to life. Every character in a scene is never made to be minor no matter how little they say or do. Sharply observed, blunt, at times funny, unflinching, indelible. You won’t mind at all that the last line of the story will break your heart over and over again in just the right place.”

Corinna Chong said, “I’m floored that Kids in Kindergarten was chosen among so many brilliant pieces as the winner of the 2021 CBC Short Story Prize. What an incredible honour! I found it challenging to write about the subject of pregnancy loss with the sensitivity it deserves, and I’m gratified to know that the story resonated with the jury. Many thanks to CBC Books.”

The four runners-up for the 2021 CBC Short Story Prize, each receiving $1,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts, are: Brooks McMullin of Prince Albert, Sask. for Deville at Home; Miranda Morris of Hamilton for Stump; Ben Pitfield of Toronto for Leaving Moonbeam; and Saeed Teebi of Toronto for Her First Palestinian.

CBC Books also announced Julie Bouchard as the winner of the French grand prize for Voici Vivian Vachon. More information is available at ICI.Radio-canada.ca/icionlit under “Prix de la nouvelle Radio-Canada.”

For more information on the CBC Literary Prizes, please visit CBCBooks.ca.

About CBC Books 

Home to Canada ReadsWriters & Company with Eleanor Wachtel, The Next Chapter with Shelagh Rogers, Canada Writes and the CBC Literary Prizes, CBC Books connects Canadians with books, encouraging a shared love of reading and writing. For book news, writing challenges, reading lists, book recommendations and more, visit CBCBooks.ca.

About CBC/Radio-Canada

CBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster. Through our mandate to inform, enlighten and entertain, we play a central role in strengthening Canadian culture. As Canada’s trusted news source, we offer a uniquely Canadian perspective on news, current affairs and world affairs. Our distinctively homegrown entertainment programming draws audiences from across the country. Deeply rooted in communities, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We also deliver content in Spanish, Arabic and Chinese, as well as both official languages, through Radio Canada International (RCI). We are leading the transformation to meet the needs of Canadians in a digital world.

About Canada Council for the Arts
The Canada Council for the Arts is Canada’s public arts funder.

The Council’s grants, services, initiatives, prizes, and payments contribute to the vibrancy of a creative and diverse arts and literary scene and support its presence across Canada and abroad. The Council’s investments foster greater engagement in the arts among Canadians and international audiences.

The Council’s Public Lending Right (PLR) program makes annual payments to creators whose works are held in Canadian public libraries.

About Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

Founded in 1933, Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity is a learning organization built upon an extraordinary legacy of excellence in artistic and creative development. What started as a single course in drama has grown to become the global organization leading in arts, culture, and creativity across dozens of disciplines. From our home in the stunning Canadian Rocky Mountains, Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity aims to inspire everyone who attends our campus – artists, leaders, and thinkers – to unleash their creative potential and realize their unique contribution to society through cross-disciplinary learning opportunities, world-class performances, and public outreach.

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