‘DON’T LOOK BACK’: OJIBWE ARTIST CODY COYOTE DESCRIBES RECLAIMING HIS IDENTITY AFTER INTERGENERATIONAL TRAUMA

For Ottawa-based rapper and motivational speaker Cody “Coyote” Purcell, working through intergenerational trauma meant sticking to his dream of making music.

TORONTO — For Ottawa-based rapper and motivational speaker Cody “Coyote” Purcell, working through intergenerational trauma meant sticking to his dream of making music.

Purcell grew up in Ottawa’s Pineview neighbourhood, which at the time was known for violence and gang activity.

“A lot of people that I grew up with in this neighbourhood – some didn’t make it, some are deceased, some are locked up in jail,” Purcell told CTV News’ Creeson Agecoutay.

Purcell himself joined a gang after high school, and it wasn’t until taking part in an Indigenous justice program at 21 that he turned his life around.

“They brought me to my first sweat lodge, round dances, powwows and had a healing circle where I was able to vent and tell them everything,” Purcell said.

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