How ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Will Remain Relevant in a Trump and #MeToo World

Showrunner Bruce Miller talks with THR about how season two of the award-winning Hulu drama will continue to explore parallels with Trump, the Time's Up movement and more: "You can't avoid the influence."

THE HANDMAID'S TALE -- The Emmy-winning drama series returns with a second season shaped by Offred’s pregnancy and her ongoing fight to free her future child from the dystopian horrors of Gilead. “Gilead is within you” is a favorite saying of Aunt Lydia. In Season Two, Offred and all our characters will fight against – or succumb to – this dark truth.(Photo by: Take Five/Hulu)

Showrunner Bruce Miller talks with THR about how season two of the award-winning Hulu drama will continue to explore parallels with Trump, the Time’s Up movement and more: “You can’t avoid the influence.”

Its meteoric cultural impact is but one of the many reasons why Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale became an award-winning lightning rod of a television series. And the streaming service, which recently topped 17 million subscribers, hopes that the Elisabeth Moss starrer from showrunner Bruce Miller continues to be as culturally relevant in April as its first season was when it was filmed before Donald Trump was elected president. 

Based on Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel of the same name, with the adaptation first bowing on Hulu in April 2017, The Handmaid’s Tale centers on Offred (Moss), formerly known as June, and formerly in control of her own life. That all changed when religious zealots forcefully seized control over the United State of America and turned it into the dystopian nation of Gilead, a world in which men wield absolute power over women, many of whom now serve as “handmaids,” tasked with reproduction in an increasingly sterile society. 

Released in the months following Trump’s election, and in the midst of a rising tide of activism against systemic misogyny, The Handmaid’s Tale arrived with painfully relevant cultural impact, with the now-iconic uniform of the handmaids worn worldwide at protests, just as one example of the show’s widely felt significance. 

“It’s a costume that people have taken beyond the show and out into the real world,” Miller tells The Hollywood Reporter about how The Handmaid’s Tale has transcended television to become part of a global conversation. “It’s amazing.”

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