“LETTERKENNY,” A SURREAL CANADIAN COMEDY TO RIVAL “SCHITT’S CREEK”

Letterkenny” began life on YouTube and made the jump to television in 2015, when it was picked up by the Canadian streaming service Crave. It almost instantaneously became a massive hit.

Letterkenny (Handout Photo)

The TV-show epigram offers a delicious sense of narrative infinity: think of “There are eight million stories in the naked city; this has been one of them,” which closed every episode of the mid-century police drama “Naked City,” or “These are their stories,” the iconic kickoff to “Law & Order.” The exquisitely weird Canadian sitcom “Letterkenny” patches together those two pronouncements to craft its own self-perpetuating statement of purpose: “There are 5000 people in Letterkenny,” the screen reads at the start of each episode. “These are their problems.”

The series, whose first six seasons are available to American viewers on Hulu (a Hulu-exclusive seventh season was recently announced), follows the goings on of the titular town, a farming hamlet in rural Ontario. The plot, insofar as there is one, centers on the minor clashes among the locals’ assorted cliques.

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