NETFLIX ANNOUNCES FUNDING FOR NEW GLOBAL PROGRAMS TO BOOST FEMALE CREATIVES

The issue of whether international streaming services should abide by Canadian content regulations is far from settled. In the meantime, Netflix is amassing some goodwill by funding the development of Canadian creators.

NETFLIX TO FUND CANADIAN PROGRAMS FOCUSED ON FEMALE-LED FILM AND TV PRODUCTION

The issue of whether international streaming services should abide by Canadian content regulations is far from settled. In the meantime, Netflix is amassing some goodwill by funding the development of Canadian creators.

Last week, the streamer announced its new Netflix Fund for Creative Equity: US$20-million a year for the next five years to build more inclusive pipelines around the globe for filmmakers behind the camera. On Thursday, in honour of International Women’s Day, Bela Bajaria, Netflix’s vice-president of global series, announced that the first US$5-million will go to programs that identify, train and provide work for female creators – and two of those programs are here in Canada.

“This is personal for me,” Bajaria wrote in an e-mail. She was born in London, and moved to the United States with her parents, who were raised in East Africa, when she was 8. “As a woman of colour, growing up there weren’t many people who looked like me on screen. The fund is a way to give the next generation of women storytellers the tools they need to claim their seat at the table.” READ MORE


NETFLIX ANNOUNCES FUNDING FOR NEW GLOBAL PROGRAMS TO BOOST FEMALE CREATIVES

In advance of International Women’s Day on March 8th, Netflix today announced the first $5 million of their recently established Creative Equity Fund will go towards programs that help to nurture and develop women in the entertainment industry around the world.

Head of Global TV Bela Bajaria made the announcement via a blog post on Netflix’s company site.

Dedicating $20 million annually over the next five years, the fund seeks to set underrepresented communities up for success in the TV and film industries by identifying, training and providing job placement for global talent.

In her message, Bajaria points to the lack of representation she encountered as a child as the inspiration for amplifying voices in her current role, saying, “As an Indian woman growing up in the US, I didn’t see anyone on screen that looked like me until Parminder Nagra joined ER in 2003. READ MORE


NETFLIX TO SPEND $5 MILLION FROM CREATIVE EQUITY FUND TO UPLIFT WOMEN IN ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY, PER BELA BAJARIA POST

In advance of International Women’s Day on March 8, Netflix Head of Global TV Bela Bajaria announced that the first $5 million of a recently announced Creative Equity Fund will go towards programs that help to nurture, develop and uplift women in the entertainment industry globally.

The fund dedicates $20 million annually over the next five years to setting underrepresented communities up for success in the TV and film industries, as well as bespoke Netflix programs that will help us to identify, train and provide job placement for up-and-coming talent globally. READ MORE


NETFLIX WANTS TO HELP WOMEN CREATORS TO BE MORE THAN TRAILBLAZERS

Priah Ferguson remembers the very first time she saw herself on screen. She was 5 years old, watching Tyler Perry’s 2007 movie Daddy’s Little Girls, and mesmerized by China Anne McClain.

“It felt like I was watching myself,” she told Refinery29 on a recent phone call. “I had a connection with the McClain sisters through the screen. I felt like they were telling my story. They looked like me, too, so that’s what made me more connected to it, and made the story more believable and relatable.”

Now 14, Ferguson plays that same role for many young Black girls. Her character Erica Sinclair on Neflix’s Stranger Things was the breakout star of the show’s third season, and Ferguson says she’s been contacted by many fans who felt moved by what they saw. READ MORE

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