RESIDUALS CAN MAKE UP 75% OF A MUSICIAN’S MOVIE SCORE PAYCHEQUE — BUT NOT ON STREAMING

New tentative agreement with U.S. studios doesn't budge on streaming payouts

Members of the American Federation of Musicians staged a rally in New York this past fall, calling for improved compensation for musicians working on film and TV productions. (Joanna Maurer/AFM)

Professional violinist Joanna Maurer recently played on the film scores of both the comic book-inspired drama Joker and the holiday comedy Noelle. She did the same work, for equally prominent companies.

But the New York-based musician says she’ll earn 75 per cent less for Noelle simply because it was released on Disney Plus, the new video-streaming service that launched on Nov. 14 and has already garnered more than 10 million subscribers.

For the past several months, the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) has held rallies — including outside of the home of a Disney executive — and posted on social media under the hashtag #BandTogether as part of its campaign to fight for residual income on films made for streaming services. The campaign was launched ahead of the union’s negotiations for a new agreement with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP).

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