SONGWRITERS DEMAND POP STARS STOP TAKING ROYALTIES FOR HITS THEY DIDN’T WRITE

A group of hit songwriters calling themselves “The Pact” is calling on artists to stop demanding a share of the publishing royalties when they aren’t involved in the writing of a song.

Attending a concert. (bernardbodo/Istock.com)

TORONTO — A group of hit songwriters calling themselves “The Pact” is calling on artists to stop demanding a share of the publishing royalties when they aren’t involved in the writing of a song.

In a recently published open letter, the group explained that a “growing number of artists” have demanded publishing royalties for songs they didn’t write.

“These artists will go on to collect revenue from touring, merchandise, brand partnerships, and many other revenue streams, while the songwriters have only their publishing revenue as a means of income,” the letter stated.

“This demand for publishing is often able to happen because the artist and/or their representation abuse leverage, use bully tactics and threats, and prey upon writers who may choose to give up some of their assets rather than lose the opportunity completely.”

The group said the practice has become “normalized” and songwriters haven’t joined together to fight back. That is, until now.

“This body of songwriters will not give publishing or songwriting credit to anyone who did not create or change the lyric or melody or otherwise contribute to the composition without a reasonably equivalent/meaningful exchange for all the writers on the song,” the group wrote.

While the identities of the founding members of the group have not been revealed, signatories to the letter included Emily Warren, Justin Tranter, Ross Golan, Victoria Monet, Amy Allen, Savan Kotecha, and Joel Little.

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