STAGE DESIGN IN FATAL RADIOHEAD CONCERT COLLAPSE CALLED FOR PARTS THAT DIDN’T EXIST, WITNESS SAYS

'It's ridiculous,' says father of Scott Johnson, drum technician killed in 2012 collapse

A collapsed stage is shown at Downsview Park in Toronto on June 16, 2012. An inquest into a stage collapse that killed Radiohead drum technician Scott Johnson is underway. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

The design for a stage that collapsed before a Radiohead concert in Toronto was flawed from its inception — and several people knew about the problems for years, according to Dale Martin, head of the company contracted by Live Nation to erect the stage.

Martin, who owned now defunct Optex Staging, testified Tuesday at the coroner’s inquest into the death of 33-year-old Scott Johnson, the Radiohead drum technician who was killed when the stage roof came tumbling down on June 16, 2012.

The stage roof designs called for a three-inch-thick roof truss component that Optex simply did not have in its inventory, the inquest heard.

“It’s garbage,” Martin said of the design.  “It never existed. This drawing was always wrong.”

“Everybody that has been involved with any of our staging for years have known about those drawings being inaccurate,” Martin said.

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