WOMEN BEHIND CANADIAN TV: ADRIANA MAGGS

Writing certainly runs in the Maggs family. Father Randall is a Canadian poet and both of his daughters are writers. In fact, both of Randall’s daughters have seen their writing careers begin in Newfoundland and find great successes in the Canadian television industry.

Writing certainly runs in the Maggs family. Father Randall is a Canadian poet and both of his daughters are writers. In fact, both of Randall’s daughters have seen their writing careers begin in Newfoundland and find great successes in the Canadian television industry. Jane, most recently co-created CBC’s Bellevue, while her sister Adriana Maggs, has written on some of Canadian TV’s most popular series including Rookie Blue, Saving Hope, Frontier and the upcoming CBC drama Caught. Adriana also directed the feature film Grown Up Movie Star starring Tatiana Maslany and Shawn Doyle.

Maggs recently spoke with The TV Junkies as part of our Women Behind Canadian TV series to discuss making her way from Newfoundland to Toronto while working in the industry. She talked about the advantages of having family in the business, as well as how she found her creative start locally. Maggs also shared her views on the changes she’s seen regarding women directors, and why she desperately wants to see more diverse voices in writing rooms telling authentic stories on screen.

The TV Junkies: You’re pretty busy and have a few projects with Caught and Little Dogcoming out later this spring. I’m really glad you were able to join us for this.

Adriana Maggs: My pleasure! I’ve actually really noticed a difference in the industry, particularly with directing, so I wanted to do this series. With writing in the past, I know I’ve been on shows where I made less than men, but it’s also so subjective with ‘what is this person bringing? They’ve done so many other shows in higher credited positions.’ Because of that subjectiveness, you can suspect that women get paid lower, but there really are so many variables. However, with directing I’ve noticed a big difference in Canada, and since CBC mandated that they wanted 50 per cent of their shows directed by women, it has made a huge difference.

LEAVE A REPLY